Archives For wizards of the coast

What I read in September

Lise —  September 27, 2017 — 13 Comments

A Warriors Journey by Paul Thompson and Tonya Cook.

[ completed ]


The first title in a new trilogy from Dragonlance author team Thompson and Cook. 
Writing team Thompson & Cook once again explore the history of the ancient Dragonlance world in “A Warrior’s Journey,” the first title in the new Ergoth trilogy. Considered the historical specialists of the Dragonlance world, the authors take the story to a colorful and violent era of its history that has not been previously chronicled in any novel. 
The mighty Ergothian empire is gripped by civil war. 
Centuries before the first Cataclysm sunders Ansalon, two imperial dynasties struggle for supremacy. Brutal warlords jockey for power, while corrupt wizards sell their skills to the highest bidder. Unnatural monsters prey on the unwary. 
Amid this chaos and upheaval, a brave young peasant shakes the towers of the mighty as his fate and the destiny of Krynn collide.


This book follows the story of a farmer boy named Tol. He is just doing his duty when an injured man rides into the farm, he hides him and keeps him safe from some attackers, and suddenly Tol finds himself in a new city with a new title. The story is interesting enough, but Tol just achieves victory after victory and there isn’t really any thrill to it. It’s just him doing well and that’s pretty much it. It’s not the worst story I have read but it could do with more conflict, more sense of urgency during battle or during anything in general to keep the reader more engaged. This is the first book of a trilogy, but I don’t know if I would want to read the other two.

War for the oaks by Emma Bull

[ completed ]

War for the Oaks

Eddi McCandry has just left her boyfriend and their band when she finds herself running through the Minneapolis night, pursued by a sinister man and a huge, terrifying dog. The two creatures are one and the same: a phouka, a faerie being who has chosen Eddi to be a mortal pawn in the age-old war between the Seelie and Unseelie Courts. Eddi isn’t interested–but she doesn’t have a choice. Now she struggles to build a new life and new band when she might not even survive till the first rehearsal.


This book was weird, really weird! It’s an old and not really modern book with outdated references and descriptions but it was entertaining. It is said to be the first proper urban fantasy book and that it is a true staple for anyone interested in the genre, but it all comes down to personal preference. It was a bit confusing to keep up with, Eddi was not the most likable character and I really wish there wasn’t as big of a focus on romance. The relationships that were formed didn’t really bring anything good to the story for me. I was more interested in the fae folk and everything that had to do with them and i feel like I was neglected that because of the space the romances needed. It kept me entertained for a while though so I had to give it a fairly good rating.


Dragon Age: Last Flight by Liane Merciel

[ completed ]

Last Flight (Dragon Age, #5)

Return to Thedas, the setting of BioWare’s award-winning Dragon Age dark fantasy rpg, and discover what dark, forgotten secrets lurk in the history of the legendary Grey Wardens.

The Grey Wardens are heroes across Thedas once again: the Archdemon has been defeated with relative ease and the scattered darkspawn are being driven back underground. The Blight is over. Or so it seems.

Valya, a young elven mage recently recruited into the Wardens, has been tasked with studying the historical record of previous Blights in order to gain insight into newly reported, and disturbing, darkspawn phenomena. Her research into the Fourth Blight leads her to an encoded reference scrawled in the margins of an ancient map, and to the hidden diary of Issenya, one of the last of the fabled griffon riders. As the dark secrets buried in Isseyna’s story unfold, Valya begins to question everything she thought she knew about the heroic Grey Wardens. . . .


This novel tells the story about why the griffons disappeared from Thedas and it would definitely change your perspective on the Grey Wardens.. I always thought they were selfless heroes, but there’s always bad apples in any kind of faction. The novel kinda follows two stories, the story of Valya, who finds the diary owned by the main character in the second story, who goes by the name Isseya. It’s a rather tragic story because they do not treat the griffons well at all. Luckily it has a somewhat happy ending, so it was a good read for me at least. I don’t require all stories to have a happy ending, but when it is about innocent animals, it needs one.

Dragon Age: The Masked Empire by Patrick Weekes

[ completed ]

The Masked Empire (Dragon Age, #4)

Empress Celene of Orlais rose to the throne of the most powerful nation in Thedas through wisdom, wit, and ruthless manipulation. Now, the empire she has guided into an age of enlightenment is threatened from within by imminent war between the templars and the mages, even as rebellion stirs among the downtrodden elves To save Orlais, Celene must keep her hold on the throne by any means necessary.

Fighting with the legendary skill of the Orlesian Chevaliers , Grand Duke Gaspard has won countless battles for the empire and the empress But has he fought in vain? As the Circle fails and chaos looms, Gaspard begins to doubt that Celene’s diplomatic approach to the mage problem or the elven uprisings will keep the empire safe. Perhaps it is time for a new leader, one who lives by the tenets of the Chevalier’s Code, to make Orlais strong again.

Briala has been Celene’s handmaid since the two of them were children, subtly using her position to help improve the lives of elves across Orlais. She is Celene’s confidante, spymaster, and lover, but when politics force the empress to choose between the rights of Briala’s people and the Orlesian throne, Briala must in turn decide where her true loyalties lie.

Alliances are forged and promises broken as Celene and Gaspard battle for the throne of Orlais But in the end, the elves who hide in the forests or starve in the alienages may decide the fate of the masked empire.


I would recommend to read this book before playing Dragon Age: Inquisition, as it helps you with understanding most of what is going on during the “Wicked eyes and wicked hearts” quest that takes place during one of Empress Celene’s great balls. The novel gives you an insight to Orlais’ politics and shows you just how terrible it could be to be an empress. We follow the story of Celene and her lover, the handmaiden Briala. Celene’s position is always being threatened by her distant cousin, the Grand Duke Gaspard who despises her female companion, and he despises her affinity towards the elves. It is a gruesome tale with a lot of death and deceit, but it is wonderfully written and it is one of my two favorites out of the dragon age novels.


American Gods by Neil Gaiman

[ unfinished ]

American Gods (American Gods, #1)

Days before his release from prison, Shadow’s wife, Laura, dies in a mysterious car crash. Numbly, he makes his way back home. On the plane, he encounters the enigmatic Mr Wednesday, who claims to be a refugee from a distant war, a former god and the king of America.

Together they embark on a profoundly strange journey across the heart of the USA, whilst all around them a storm of preternatural and epic proportions threatens to break.

Scary, gripping and deeply unsettling, American Gods takes a long, hard look into the soul of America. You’ll be surprised by what – and who – it finds there…


I picked this up, read a bit over 100 pages and haven’t touched it again. The story is confusing me a lot, it feels so heavy to read and I don’t really know what is going on.. It’s also kinda gross, talking about someone dying with a dick in their mouth, then the main character kissing that corpse in a ‘dream’ after.. yuck. I might pick it back up some day but not right now. I’m sure it’s great though, everyone speaks so warmly of it, but they’re probably not as sensitive to certain topics as I am.

Have you read anything interesting this month?


425608Weasel’s luck is a novel set in the Dragonlance universe, a series licensed by Wizards of the coast, the company that publishes Dungeons & Dragons, Magic the Gathering and so on. It is number three in a collection called “Heroes”. There is another novel about the main character of this one, Galen Pathwarden, called “Galen Beknighted”, but I haven’t read that one yet.

The novel was first published in 1990, so for some it could possibly feel a bit dated, it is a 27 year old book after all, but I still think it a quite good work of fiction.

In the novel we follow the story of the wimpy Galen Pathwarden, commonly called Weasel, who has one brother that hates him, and another who is very spiritual and a bit out of this world. One event sets in motion a chain of events that leads to his older brother nearly killing him, a knight taking him on as a squire and a meeting with creatures who were previously only known to him as legends. Teaming up with a centaur and a knight, he tries to avoid an evil force that wants to use him as its pawn. The novel is both humorous and exciting and I did enjoy reading every page of it. The main character can be a bit annoying at times, but the story as a whole is well written.

Here’s an excerpt from the DND wiki:

The Sign of the Weasel is tunnel on tunnel, enchantment on enchantment. He digs beneath himself, and in digging discovers all roads into nothing. — The Calantina, IX:IX

Weasel’s luck was not always good.
Galen Pathwarden, known unaffectionately as “the Weasel,” would give anything to stay clear of adventure, danger, or heroism.

But that is before young Galen is pitch-forked into the center of a centuries-old curse, one family blood-feud too many, and a knightly tournament unto death.
Together, Galen, the great Solamnic Knight, Sir Bayard Brightblade, and a non-too-bright centaur Agion must overcome the schemes and traps of a sinister illusionist known only as the Scorpion.

I would recommend the book for anyone who is either into the Dragonlance universe, or into Dungeons and Dragons in general, since it is the same kind of fiction as that. Reading about centaurs and satyrs and old curses is always fun to me, so maybe someone with similar interests could get some enjoyment out of it too.

Uten navn

TheinheritanceThe Inheritance is a novel set in the Dragonlance universe, a series licensed by Wizards of the coast, publishers of Dungeons and Dragons, Magic the Gathering and so on. It is a fantasy novel and it provides plot key points that fans of the fantasy universe could appreciate. To me it was an emotional novel because of the female protagonist and what she is put through, both physically and mentally. If you are sensitive to subjects like sexual abuse, miscarriages and violence, I would not recommend this one. Nothing is too grotesquely described but you are left with a terrible feeling after reading those parts anyways.

I do not condemn the author though, sometimes things just have to be written, sometimes it is just part of the plot.

Plot introduction

The setting is Qualinost, Pax Tharkas, and the borderlands between Qualinost and Thobardin.

Plot summary

The book begins with Elansa Sungold going to the border to heal a group of trees with her Blue Phoenix, a magical artifact passed down since the Age of Dreams to woodshapers in her family. The Blue Phoenix is a symbol of Habbakuk, and the artifact may be a holy artifact of Habbakuk. She is guarded by twenty elves. When they reach further into the forest, they are ambushed by goblins, which were hired by human brigands. Elansa is taken for ransom, and one of the guards who were sent to take care of her by her husband, Prince Kethrenan, is mutilated and sent back to Qualinost, the elve’s homeland, to inform them of the ransom demand, two cartloads full of the best weapons that the elves have. Elansa is taken to one of the bandits secret hideouts, and is guarded by Char, the dwarf. Brand, the leader of the bandits, also takes Elansa’s Blue Phoenix from her. In the hands of a human, it didn’t pulse with magic at all, so humans would think it’s just a pretty shaped gem. Brand kills the son of Gnash, a hobgoblin, who was sent to assist the ambush, making him an enemy of the goblins. They run from the goblins into many different secret hideouts, then hole up in one for the winter.

In the sprain, Brand’s demand for two wagons full of weapons has been acknowledged. Prince Kethrenan, and his cousin, a female warrior, drive the wagons, while other warriors hide in the woods. Their plan is to slaughter the bandits when they come to take the weapons, however, their plans are foiled when goblins, this time enemies of both, appear. Brand and his band get away with Elansa and the two wagons, leaving the elves to “mop up” the goblins. Brand stores the weapons in caches all over the stone lands, so that they won’t be discovered. A goblin “turncoat” decides to help the elves, and with his help the locate all of the weapon caches. The weapons that can’t be recovered due to transportation issues are destroyed. By plotting the caches on a map, the elves discover an arrow pointing to Pax Tharkas, perhaps the last safe house for the brigands, so the elves head to Pax Tharkas. Brand and his band know that they are being hunted, but not by whom, so they decide to go to the abandoned Pax Tharkas as a safe haven.

During this time, Char becomes almost a friend of Elansa’s. Many of the men in the group of bandits want Elansa, so Brand gives her a choice between him and them. He was just doing this to protect her, but she didn’t know that. Elansa chooses Brand. The goblins amass an army and also head to Pax Tharkas, following Brand. Brand and his followers arrive in Pax Tharkas, and a couple of goblins manage to rouse the undead guarding Kith-Kanan. While Elansa is trying to help the Bandits to destroy the undead, one of the bandits tries to rape her, but Char saves her. Elansa uses her Blue Phoenix to destroy the undead, but she faints from the strain afterwards. The elves and goblins fight outside Pax Tharkas, and the elves destroy the goblins. Prince Kethrenan’s cousin is killed. Prince Kethrenan comes in to rescue Elansa, but Elansa wants him to spare Brand. He refuses, kills Brand, and at the same time Leyerlain Starwing kills Kethrenan by throwing a dagger into his neck. At this point, Elansa realizes that she grew to love Brand. Elansa runs away with Char, before the elves come to investigate. She’s pregnant with Brand’s child, and Char convinces her to claim that she was raped to protect herself and the child, even though Brand grew, almost, to be her lover. She returns to Qualinesti. The child is known as Tanis Half-Elven.


Uten navn

Fantasy books haul 2.

Lise —  February 25, 2017 — 2 Comments

Dragonlance edition!


Winterheim by Douglas Niles

Strongwind Whalebone, king of the Highlanders, is a captive within the ogre fortress, while outside, his allies plot his rescue, and within the fortress, Grimwar Bane, the ogre king, confronts treachery and possible revolt.

Dragon’s Bluff by Mary H. Herbert

Youthful mage Ulin Majere and his traveling companion head for the port city of Flotsam to identify a murder victim, only to find themselves caught up in a dangerous web of conspiracy, a clever gang of thieves, the Knights of Neraka, and a deadly red dragon that is terrorizing the local populace.

Divine Hammer by Chris Pierson

Sorcery: A Threat to the Glory of Istar.
Twenty years have passed since Beldinas the Kingpriest assumed the throne. His is a realm of unsurpassed grandeur and wealth, a testament to the mightiest age of the empire of Istar.
But evil exists in this great realm, threatening the peace and sanctity of the province. Beldinas must turn to his most loyal lieutenant, Cathan, for help. Following Cathan’s lead, the Knights of the Divine Hammer strive to extinguish a foul sorcery that will stop at nothing to serve its own dark ends.


The Second Generation by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman

Years have passed since the end of the War of the Lance. The people of Ansalon have rebuilt their lives, their houses, their families. The Companions of the Lance, too, have returned to their homes, raising children and putting the days of their heroic deeds behind them.
But peace on Krynn comes at a price. The forces of darkness are ever vigilant, searching for ways to erode the balance of power and take control. When subtle changes begin to permeate the fragile peace, new lives are drawn into the web of fate woven around all the races. The time has come to pass the sword — or the staff — to the children of the Lance.
They are the Second Generation.
An all-new repackaged paperback edition of a classic Dragonlance novel.
This book of five novellas bridges the gap between the Chronicles and Legends trilogies and “Dragons of Summer Flame,” While detailing their adventures, “The Second Generation” also sets up key events and characters in future Dragonlance novels.

Draconian Measures by Don Perrin and Margaret Weis

The regiment of draconian engineers featured in “The Doom Brigade” seek a safe haven for their precious cargo of young draconians. All they have to do is stay alive. Surely that shouldn’t be too hard.
But Commander Kang puzzles over a sinister mystery. Why are some of his men vanishing? Kang will have to use draconian measures to defeat his foes and save his race. They’d better be enough — the fate of his entire race hangs in the balance.

The Messenger by Douglas Niles

Exiled in disgrace to the harsh land called the Icereach, Kerrick, a Silvanesti elf, encounters a group of barbarian villagers that is making a determined stand against the encroachment of the remnants of a powerful ogre empire that is out to seize control of the frozen world.


A warrior’s journey by Paul D. Thompson and Tonya C. Cook

Writing team Thompson & Cook once again explore the history of the ancient Dragonlance world in “A Warrior’s Journey,” the first title in the new Ergoth trilogy. Considered the historical specialists of the Dragonlance world, the authors take the story to a colorful and violent era of its history that has not been previously chronicled in any novel.
The mighty Ergothian empire is gripped by civil war.
Centuries before the first Cataclysm sunders Ansalon, two imperial dynasties struggle for supremacy. Brutal warlords jockey for power, while corrupt wizards sell their skills to the highest bidder. Unnatural monsters prey on the unwary.
Amid this chaos and upheaval, a brave young peasant shakes the towers of the mighty as his fate and the destiny of Krynn collide.

The inheritance by Nancy Varian Berberick 

Kidnapped by a ragtag gang of outlaws, an elven princess patiently waits for her husband’s rescue, until she falls in love with the leader of her captors, a love that results in the birth of one of Krynn’s greatest heroes, Tanis Half-Elven, Hero of the Lance.

The Players of Gilean by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman

Across the ages roams an immortal troupe of actors, gifted with fantastical powers and led by a mysterious artiste with a penchant for meddling. Wherever they roam, they encounter magic and monsters and evil that requires taming.
This is the first anthology based on characters from the extraordinary novella “The Travelling Players of Gilean,” by Margaret Weis and Aron Eisenberg, which was featured in The Best of Tales, Volume One. This new anthology also features novellas by best-selling Dragonlance authors Douglas Niles, Richard A. Knaak, Paul B. Thompson, and a new collaboration by Jean Rabe and Aron Eisenberg.

Have you purchased or read anything fun recently?