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What you will need for the dough:

  • 1 kg all purpose flour (you can mix flour types if you want)
  • 6 dl lukewarm water
  • 2 dl olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 bag of dry yeast (Or use active yeast if you have that)

For ‘toppings’:

  • Some olive oil to drizzle on top
  • Sea salt flakes
  • Rosemary if you’re into that, I’m not.

Bake at 200 degrees Celsius for 30-45 minutes.

How to do it:

Combine the water and oil at first. It will likely not mix but try to do it anyways. Then combine the dry ingredients, make sure that the yeast gets distributed evenly into the flour. Slowly pour the dry ingredients into the water and oil mixture, don’t mix it too hard because you want it to be a loose dough, not a tightly kneaded one. Once they’re mixed, I’d recommend rubbing some oil between your hands before gently kneading the dough. The recipe I used said to pull the dough out and tuck it into the middle until it becomes smooth-ish. After that, leave it to rise for an hour, or until it has doubled in size. I left mine for two and a half hours, partially because I forgot about it. The bowl I used was covered by plastic and a kitchen towel, it’s just bare for the picture.

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After it has finished rising, dump it onto a baking tray, either one that is oiled up or use a baking sheet beneath it to avoid it from sticking to the tray. Gently press it down to spread it out and shape it into however you want it to look and then leave it to rise again for another half hour. I’d recommend starting to pre-heat your oven to 200 degrees Celsius at this point. After that, gently press your finger into the dough here and there, drizzle some oil, salt and whatever else you want on it and put it in the oven.

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Let it bake for 30-45 minutes, depending on how thick it is then take it out and let it rest and cool down for a while. Cut it into pieces and serve. If you don’t eat or use it all at once, you can definitely freeze it and reheat it in the oven whenever you want. It has worked really well for me, at least, because I can’t possibly finish all of this on my own.

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Have you tried making focaccia before? How did it go? 

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A very (n)ice cream.

November 8, 2017 — 12 Comments

Nice cream? What?

One of my favorite discoveries this year is Nice cream. Nice cream is basically the vegan version of ice cream and it can be made with as little as just one ingredient. All you need is some frozen banana and that’s pretty much it! You can add in any kind of extra ingredients that you want. Some popular varieties include peanut butter, pineapple or chocolate chips.

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I prefer to eat mine plain, simply because I love the taste of bananas, or now and then I add in some peanuts. Something to remember though is that you should use very ripe bananas to make the mashing process easier, and cutting it up in smaller pieces before freezing them. I use a hand mixer to make it but using a blender or a nutribullet kind of thing could work well too. Just blend it into your preferred consistency and transfer it to portion sized boxes or whatever kind of container you want to keep them in. You can put it in the freezer for about an hour after making it for a better consistency or just leave it in there and thaw it later on when you want to eat it.

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I love Nice cream because it has so many options for customization, its totally dairy free and pretty much anyone could eat it, unless you’re allergic to bananas of course. It’s also very easy to make, and it takes just a few minutes to use the hand mixer or blender. The most time consuming part is waiting for the bananas to become frozen. Have you tried Nice cream before? What did you think of it? 

When I was younger,  my mum always used to make cinnamon rolls for me and my siblings. It was pretty much a monthly event and we always looked forward to digging into still warm and soft baked goods. Sadly, she stopped doing so as we grew older, we moved out and the cinnamon rolls were in the past. But luckily, I realized that since I’m a full grown adult, I can make them whenever the heck I want! So that’s what I did. I found my mum’s old recipe, took out and replaced anything that wasn’t vegan and ended up with the best cinnamon rolls I have ever tasted. I don’t enjoy putting anything on them, I prefer them bare and tasting of heavenly cinnamon.

Here’s what you need:

I found the recipe in my mother’s old recipe book so the measurements are a bit weird. For me it made around 18 cinnamon rolls. Bake them at 200 degrees Celsius for approximately 15 minutes.

  • 1.5 liters of flour (the measurement cups with sections for flour, sugar etc didn’t exist back when she wrote this down).
  • 50 gr active yeast (or one bag of dry yeast)
  • 150 grams of vegan butter or margarine
  • 5 dl of a milk replacement. I used oat milk.
  • 1.5 dl sugar
  • Half a teaspoon of salt

For the filling:

  • 3 tablespoons of butter
  • 3 tablespoons of sugar
  • As much cinnamon as you want

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Here’s how to do it:

Mix all of the dry ingredients in a fairly large bowl. That means you gotta put in the flour, the sugar, the dry yeast (or active yeast) and the salt. Stir it together so that its all evenly dispersed in the bowl.

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Melt the margarine/butter and let it cool a bit before putting it in the bowl so that you won’t immediately kill the yeast. You want it to be at least at body temperature. A quick fix is to pour the melted butter into the milk/milk replacement to cool it down.

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After it has cooled down enough, pour the wet ingredients into the bowl and mix it together thoroughly. You could probably use a baking machine for this, I didn’t want to wake up my dad who was napping in the next room so i opted for stirring it myself. Once it is a firm dough, leave it to rise for 30 minutes. The recipe says to wait for the oven to heat up during that time but it doesn’t take that long to do so anymore.

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After 30 minutes, the dough is ready! Separate it into two parts, you’ll want to make two “sausages” of cinnamon rolls. Use a rolling pin to make each of the two parts into large rectangles. They don’t have to be perfect but the more rectangular they are, the better the cinnamon rolls will look.

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You can see how not squared mine is, I was not patient with it at all. Anyways, once you’re done with the rolling pin, you can choose to either combine all of the ingredients for the filling, (butter, sugar and cinnamon), into a kind of paste and then spread it out on the dough, or put everything on individually. I did the latter, because I always enjoy putting on some extra cinnamon.

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Then roll it up along the long side so that it ends up looking like a spiral sausage, cut off pieces approximately 2 to 2.5 cm thick (about an inch) and put them on a baking tray. I really recommend using some kind of parchment paper because it’s likely that some sugar will melt and pour out of the bottom of the rolls. Also push them down slightly in the middle of the roll if you want them flat-ish.

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Once the oven is warm enough, put them in and leave them in there for about 15 minutes. I left mine in for a few more minutes to make sure they’re baked all the way through since they are kind of thick. Leave them to cool for a little bit, seriously, the melted sugar will burn your tongue. Afterwards, eat as many as your heart desire.

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Do you enjoy cinnamon rolls? Was it part of your childhood too? 

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I think banana is my favorite flavor..

It has always been so ever since my youth. Sadly I haven’t found a lot of genuinely good (or healthy) banana flavored things, mostly sweets or gummies. I’m not too keen on sweet foods all the time, and I love making those kind of breakfast muffin things, where you add in veggies or pizza filling, so when I saw this recipe advertised as a ‘breakfast muffin’ I was really happy. The original recipe wasn’t vegan because it had milk in it, but I can’t have dairy so for me it is now vegan by replacing the milk with an oat based cream that pretty much has the same properties as regular dairy cream. You could probably just use any other milk replacement too like almond milk, soy milk or rice milk. I just prefer the oats because it doesn’t really add any flavor.

The best thing about these is that they’re so simple to make! The only thing that takes time is mashing the bananas, and the baking itself, honestly.

Here’s what you need:

This recipe should make at least 12 fairly large muffins. Bake at 200° Celsius for 16-19 minutes.

  • 210 grams of flour
  • 160 grams of sugar
  • 1 teaspoon of baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon of baking soda
  • Half a teaspoon of salt
  • 50 ml vegetable oil ( I used rapeseed oil, or canola oil as it’s also known as.)
  • 50 ml of cream or a milk replacement (milk if you don’t care if it’s vegan or not)
  • 3 medium bananas ( I used four because mine were on the smaller side)
  • (optional) Vanilla extract

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Here’s how to do it:

Start off by using a blender, hand mixer or stick mixer to turn your bananas into a puree of sorts. I cut mine into pieces and used a stick mixer to make it a smooth, lump-less mixture. Make sure to make it completely smooth as the lumps could make your muffin be all doughy after it finished baking.

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Add inn the 50 ml of oil and the 50 ml of cream, stir it all together. It might seem like a lot of oil but you won’t notice it at all after mixing in the dry ingredients.

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Add in the sugar, the baking powder, baking soda, salt and lastly the flour. Make sure to add it a little bit at a time to avoid having any lumps forming. I just used a spatula to gently stir it all together.

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Your batter should look something like this. It’s not too thick but not too thin. You can adjust it however you wish it to be by either adding more flour or more of the cream. I wouldn’t recommend adding water to it since we have used so much oil.

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Use either a muffin tin or paper muffin holder things like these. I’m not really sure what they are called in English.. Fill them up a little bit over half way, the batter should be enough for at least 12 muffins. I ended up with 17, so I guess my muffin paper thingies were a bit smaller than normal. Once you’re done, pop them in the oven and let them bake for around 16 to 19 minutes. Mine were in for 20 and was a bit burnt near the edges.

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Once they’re done, they should look somewhat like these. Leave them on a cooling rack, and then you can add toppings to it or just eat it clean like I did, it tastes so good and so savory!

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Have you baked anything lately? 

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“Light, nourishing and delicious – krupenik’s extraordinary combination of qualities is not a contradiction.”

Krupenik is a traditional Russian baked pudding made of common products found in many homes over the course of history, and its name derives from the word for grain, «крупа» (“krupa”).

I’ve tried quite a few pudding recipes over the year that claims to be somewhat healthy, I once made a semolina pudding but it called for almost a kilo (!) of sugar so I quickly decided against it. This one, however, only uses three tablespoons of it so I was much more willing to give it a try. Krupenik is described as a pudding perfect for those who are dieting, so I’m just going to believe that and eat it without feeling bad about it. This one can be served both as a dessert, and as the main meal for breakfast, and it doesn’t matter whether it’s hot or cold. I love eating mine hot with a bit of cinnamon on top.

Here’s what you need:

  • 250 grams of buckwheat. Rinsed well and roasted if you want it to be less “slimy” and more of a different texture.
  • 300 grams of farmers cheese. I’m lactose intolerant so I can’t have cheese, but I found a lactose free cream cheese I used as a replacement. It made the pudding more runny but it works if you’re in a pinch.
  • 2 eggs.
  • 100 grams of sour cream. Again, I found a lactose free alternative, I used the iMat Fraiche from Oatly.
  • 30 grams of butter. Milk free margarine for me.
  • 2 tablespoons of rusk flour. I just used crumbled up graham crackers.
  • 3 tablespoons of sugar. You honestly don’t need more than that, the cheese is what will give the pudding it’s flavor and it’s acidity.
  • Half a teaspoon of salt.

Here’s how to do it:

The first thing you gotta do is to fill a pot with a liter of water and then bring it to a boil. While that is happening you have to measure the 250 grams of buckwheat and make sure to rinse it thoroughly. It should say on the package that some people can be allergic to the color of the buckwheat that’s why it needs the rinse beforehand.

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Once the water is boiling, put the buckwheat in it and set a timer for 15 minutes. It should be more than enough to finish boiling it, and it will turn a little bit slimy once it’s finished. You won’t notice this texture after you bake the pudding.

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While the buckwheat is boiling, crack the two eggs into a bowl. Gently beat them to mix the yolk and the whites before adding in three tablespoons of sugar, whisking it all again to mix it properly.

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Add in the farmers cheese, cream cheese in my case. I had to use kitchen scales to measure up 300 grams, the boxes of cream cheese were 175 grams each, which was more than I needed.

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I would recommend using a hand mixer for mixing in the cheese, the mixture needs to be lump free and that is difficult to achieve with a regular whisk. A balloon whisk could maybe work but I don’t have that. Once everything is blended properly and the buckwheat has finished boiling, drain the water before adding it to the egg-sugar-cheese mixture. Stir it all together. With regular farmers cheese it wont be as liquid-y as mine is, the cream cheese doesn’t have much of a body to it.

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Line a small baking pan with rusk flour/graham cracker crumbs. You can basically use anything you want in this step to add some flavor to it, though dry, crumbly biscuits would work best. Adding salted biscuits could definitely work too to make the pudding less sweet, if that is what you prefer.

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Pour the mixture into the pan to cover the crumbs, make sure it is an even layer before covering the top with a thin layer of sour cream to add in more flavor. Put it in the oven and bake it in there at 190 degrees Celsius (about 374 F) for 40 minutes. I didn’t preheat my oven because it’s a hot air oven, and it doesn’t take long at all for it to reach 190 degrees Celsius.

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If you want the pudding to be a bit more baked, you can leave it in for an extra 10 ish minutes. Mine was in for five minutes longer than it should but it was still juicy and tasted just the way it should! I cut mine into squares, (well, it didn’t want to come out as squares but I tried!), and added some cinnamon on top. If you want, you can also add in raisins or berries or anything else to add sweetness or flavor!

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