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11949576.jpgAsunder is the third book set in the Dragon Age universe, following and expanding upon the lore of the video game series. The book is written by David Gaider, lead writer of the video game series. He isn’t the best at writing engaging stories, but I do appreciate being fed more lore about my favorite characters. I would recommend reading this before playing Dragon Age: Inquisition, because you learn about one of your party members in the game, Cole. Cole is also one of my absolute favorite characters because he is really interesting. He’s not a demon, not really a spirit but still he has possessed someone and is trying to help everyone to not feel pain anymore. His actions are both sweet and horrifying, because often the solution is to take their life.

The novel is set three years later than the events in Dragon Age 2, and it is set in the Orlesian Empire. It is however before Varric is questioned by the seeker Cassandra Pentaghast.

 

A mystical killer stalks the halls of the White Spire, the heart of templar power in the mighty Orlesian Empire. To prove his innocence, Rhys reluctantly embarks on a journey into the western wastelands that will not only reveal much more than he bargained for but change the fate of his fellow mages forever.

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The book summary doesn’t reveal much of the plot, but it’s basically a story about Cole killing people, Rhys wanting to protect him. They go on a journey to solve some mystery, Cole follows, things gets resolved and all that. I don’t think you would like the book if you haven’t played the games or read any of the other novels. It’s not the greatest work of fiction but it is an amazing addition to the lore if you’re interested in it. I might just be biased but that is my opinion, you are very welcome to disagree with me. I just feel like Gaider’s novel characters fall a bit flat sometimes, meanwhile in the games they are wonderful and have proper personality to them.

I’ll include a video of one of your possible first encounters with Cole, depending on which route you choose in the game. It gives you more of an idea of what kind of person Cole is.

 

Have you read the book? Or played the games? What did you think of them?

More Dragon Age book reviews:

The Stolen Throne | The Masked Empire.

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Book Recommendation; Cress

Lise —  January 25, 2018 — 2 Comments

13206828Cress is the third book in the Lunar Chronicles series. We are nearing the end of the saga and it just gets more and more action filled with each book. The first was a bit slow, the second was just right, the third was perfect. The book is mainly centered around a Lunar shell named Cress. She was taken away from her family when she was young and was made to be a computer hacker living in a space pod all by herself. Following Cress’ story we notice some similarities to Rapunzel because her hair has been growing out in the same way. Cinder finds a transmission that was sent to Cress and that’s how their paths cross and she gets tangled up in the mess too.

I really liked this one, most people do just because they like Captain Thorne so much, I’m still a huge fan of Wolf instead. He’s just my kind of person. Jokes aside, it is a great book, a great third installment and I recommend it for anyone who has started the Lunar Chronicles and don’t know if they want to continue it. It gets better!

I’ll include the blurb from it’s page on Goodreads.

In this third book in the Lunar Chronicles, Cinder and Captain Thorne are fugitives on the run, now with Scarlet and Wolf in tow. Together, they’re plotting to overthrow Queen Levana and her army.

Their best hope lies with Cress, a girl imprisoned on a satellite since childhood who’s only ever had her netscreens as company. All that screen time has made Cress an excellent hacker. Unfortunately, she’s just received orders from Levana to track down Cinder and her handsome accomplice.

When a daring rescue of Cress goes awry, the group is separated. Cress finally has her freedom, but it comes at a higher price. Meanwhile, Queen Levana will let nothing prevent her marriage to Emperor Kai. Cress, Scarlet, and Cinder may not have signed up to save the world, but they may be the only hope the world has.

I don’t really know what else to say about it without spoiling it, honestly. It would be way better for you to actually read it without me ruining the story for you. It’s worth it, definitely. I just wish the series was longer because when I did finish it in July/August I felt devastated for a while that it was over. I’ll probably talk more about that in my post for Winter in the future.

Have you read the Lunar Chronicles? What do you think of it? 

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 What I read in November.

Some were started in October but didn’t get finished in November. There’s a few shorter stories, but anything is worth reading if it’s good. I think my favorite must have been This Crowded Earth, it’s a very possible future.

Icewall trilogy #1: The Messenger by Douglas Niles

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Exiled in disgrace to the harsh land called the Icereach, Kerrick, a Silvanesti elf, encounters a group of barbarian villagers that is making a determined stand against the encroachment of the remnants of a powerful ogre empire that is out to seize control of the frozen world.

Icewall trilogy #2: The Golden Orb by Douglas Niles

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Towering aloof and secure, the isolated fortress offers humankind a place to survive and flourish in the barren realm of Icereach. Even the elven Messenger Kerrick Fallabrine has made a home there, living among the humans and teaching them a multitude of skills. But the ogre enemies are always near, and they have developed a powerful weapon, a destructive magic encased within a sphere of solid gold. Its existence forces the humans to confront the threat of extinction that lurks outside their walls.

When the sleeper wakes by H.G Wells

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Graham, an 1890s radical pamphleteer who is eagerly awaiting the twentieth century and all the advances it will bring, is stricken with insomnia. Finally resorting to medication, he instantly falls into a deep sleep that lasts two hundred years. Upon waking in the twenty-second century to a strange and nightmarish place, he slowly discovers he is master of the world, revered by an adoring populace who consider him their leader. Terrified, he escapes from his chamber seeking solace—only to realize that not everyone adores him, some even wish to harm him.

Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

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Wuthering Heights is a wild, passionate story of the intense and almost demonic love between Catherine Earnshaw and Heathcliff, a foundling adopted by Catherine’s father. After Mr Earnshaw’s death, Heathcliff is bullied and humiliated by Catherine’s brother Hindley and wrongly believing that his love for Catherine is not reciprocated, leaves Wuthering Heights, only to return years later as a wealthy and polished man. He proceeds to exact a terrible revenge for his former miseries. The action of the story is chaotic and unremittingly violent, but the accomplished handling of a complex structure, the evocative descriptions of the lonely moorland setting and the poetic grandeur of vision combine to make this unique novel a masterpiece of English literature.

The war of the worlds by H.G Wells

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With H.G. Wells’ other novels, The War of the Worlds was one of the first and greatest works of science fiction ever to be written. Even long before man had learned to fly, H.G. Wells wrote this story of the Martian attack on England. These unearthly creatures arrive in huge cylinders, from which they escape as soon as the metal is cool. The first falls near Woking and is regarded as a curiosity rather than a danger until the Martians climb out of it and kill many of the gaping crowd with a Heat-Ray. These unearthly creatures have heads four feet in diameter and colossal round bodies, and by manipulating two terrifying machines – the Handling Machine and the Fighting Machine – they are as versatile as humans and at the same time insuperable. They cause boundless destruction. The inhabitants of the Earth are powerless against them, and it looks as if the end of the World has come. But there is one factor which the Martians, in spite of their superior intelligence, have not reckoned on. It is this which brings about a miraculous conclusion to this famous work of the imagination.

The Inmost Light by Arthur Machen

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The Inmost Light, one of Arthur Machen’s most disturbing stories, involves a doctor’s scientific experiments into occultism, and the vampiric force instigated by his unrelenting curiosity regarding the unseen elements. A large and glorious gem-stone is the vampiric mediator; soaking up the soul of the doctor’s wife; in the place of her spirit a demonic energy too-terrible-to-believe enters, transmuting her brain into that of something “not human.” Whilst the stone is the spirit appropriator, it is the process of scientific exploration into dark waters, perhaps those considered taboo, which brings about this horrific energy exchange. Dr. Black steals his wife’s soul; his own energy is then gradually sucked by the stone too. In attempting to enter the forbidden and dark zone of the “other world” for never-before-glimpsed-knowledge, he sacrifices his most valuable attribute in this world. And the sacrifice persists..

This Crowded Earth by Robert Bloch

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This Crowded Earth is a taut and compelling story about an all too possible future. Earth is overcrowded and its resources are being taxed to the limit. The government has a desperate plan, but will it work and at what price? By the author of Psycho and Yours Truly, Jack the Ripper

The Dunwich Horror by H.P Lovecraft

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The town of Dunwich, Massachusetts is thoroughly unremarkable until Wilbur Whateley is born.His “decayed” and inbred family was already unpopular due to their dabbling in the occult, and when Lavinia Whateley gives birth to a strange-looking child and refuses to say who the father was, it doesn’t improve anyone’s opinion of them. Wilbur grows incredibly fast – he begins talking at 11 months; by the time he’s three, he looks ten years old; and at four and a half, around 15. The townsfolk don’t trust him, as he gives them the creeps even more than the other Whateleys. For all that, though, they’re still willing to sell cows to the Whateley mansion; money’s money, after all, even if it is in the form of weird antique gold coins. Although for some reason, despite the truly vast amount of livestock Old Whateley buys, his herd never seems to get bigger…The household only gets more suspicious with time. The farmhouse always seems to be mysteriously under construction, with more and more windows being boarded up; the townsfolk also suspect that interior walls are being knocked out. When Wilbur is ten, Old Whateley dies, shrieking instructions to Wilbur on his deathbed; two years later, Lavinia Whateley disappears on Halloween night and is never found.Around this point, Wilbur begins to search for an unabridged copy of the Necronomicon, having learned all of what he knew from his grandfather’s library; his copy of said book is a shortened English version, which he apparently found insufficient. He discovers that nearby Miskatonic University has a complete copy, but the librarian refuses to loan it out to him. So he breaks in to steal it, only to be killed by a guard dog.And that’s when things get really weird.

The picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

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Written in his distinctively dazzling manner, Oscar Wilde’s story of a fashionable young man who sells his soul for eternal youth and beauty is the author’s most popular work. The tale of Dorian Gray’s moral disintegration caused a scandal when it first appeared in 1890, but though Wilde was attacked for the novel’s corrupting influence, he responded that there is, in fact, “a terrible moral in Dorian Gray.” Just a few years later, the book and the aesthetic/moral dilemma it presented became issues in the trials occasioned by Wilde’s homosexual liaisons, which resulted in his imprisonment. Of Dorian Gray’s relationship to autobiography, Wilde noted in a letter, “Basil Hallward is what I think I am: Lord Henry what the world thinks me: Dorian what I would like to be—in other ages, perhaps.”

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

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In his “Ghostly little book,” Charles Dickens invents the modern concept of Christmas Spirit and offers one of the world’s most adapted and imitated stories. We know Ebenezer Scrooge, Tiny Tim, and the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future, not only as fictional characters, but also as icons of the true meaning of Christmas in a world still plagued with avarice and cynicism.

 

What did you love this month? 

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In my ‘to be read’ shelf.

Lise —  October 27, 2017 — 3 Comments

I’m always looking for new books to read and I like to alternate between books in my actual bookshelf and books in my Goodreads “To-read” bookshelf. The reasons why I haven’t read these can vary between not having time yet and not having funds or not having found a legit pdf version of them to download. But I will get to them as soon as I can. What is on your to be read list?

Yes please by Amy Poehler

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Poet Anderson: The Dreamwalker by Tom DeLonge

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Sekret Machines: Gods by Tom DeLonge & Peter Levenda

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Fairest (Lunar Chronicles 3.5) by Marissa Meyer

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Cathedrals of glass: A planet of blood and ice by A.J Hartley

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There are plenty more but I suppose this is enough or else I would be here pretty much all day writing this list.

Check out Lisa’s Endless blog challenge posts for more ideas.

 

What I read in September

Lise —  September 27, 2017 — 13 Comments

A Warriors Journey by Paul Thompson and Tonya Cook.

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The first title in a new trilogy from Dragonlance author team Thompson and Cook. 
Writing team Thompson & Cook once again explore the history of the ancient Dragonlance world in “A Warrior’s Journey,” the first title in the new Ergoth trilogy. Considered the historical specialists of the Dragonlance world, the authors take the story to a colorful and violent era of its history that has not been previously chronicled in any novel. 
The mighty Ergothian empire is gripped by civil war. 
Centuries before the first Cataclysm sunders Ansalon, two imperial dynasties struggle for supremacy. Brutal warlords jockey for power, while corrupt wizards sell their skills to the highest bidder. Unnatural monsters prey on the unwary. 
Amid this chaos and upheaval, a brave young peasant shakes the towers of the mighty as his fate and the destiny of Krynn collide.

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This book follows the story of a farmer boy named Tol. He is just doing his duty when an injured man rides into the farm, he hides him and keeps him safe from some attackers, and suddenly Tol finds himself in a new city with a new title. The story is interesting enough, but Tol just achieves victory after victory and there isn’t really any thrill to it. It’s just him doing well and that’s pretty much it. It’s not the worst story I have read but it could do with more conflict, more sense of urgency during battle or during anything in general to keep the reader more engaged. This is the first book of a trilogy, but I don’t know if I would want to read the other two.


War for the oaks by Emma Bull

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War for the Oaks

Eddi McCandry has just left her boyfriend and their band when she finds herself running through the Minneapolis night, pursued by a sinister man and a huge, terrifying dog. The two creatures are one and the same: a phouka, a faerie being who has chosen Eddi to be a mortal pawn in the age-old war between the Seelie and Unseelie Courts. Eddi isn’t interested–but she doesn’t have a choice. Now she struggles to build a new life and new band when she might not even survive till the first rehearsal.

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This book was weird, really weird! It’s an old and not really modern book with outdated references and descriptions but it was entertaining. It is said to be the first proper urban fantasy book and that it is a true staple for anyone interested in the genre, but it all comes down to personal preference. It was a bit confusing to keep up with, Eddi was not the most likable character and I really wish there wasn’t as big of a focus on romance. The relationships that were formed didn’t really bring anything good to the story for me. I was more interested in the fae folk and everything that had to do with them and i feel like I was neglected that because of the space the romances needed. It kept me entertained for a while though so I had to give it a fairly good rating.


 

Dragon Age: Last Flight by Liane Merciel

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Last Flight (Dragon Age, #5)

Return to Thedas, the setting of BioWare’s award-winning Dragon Age dark fantasy rpg, and discover what dark, forgotten secrets lurk in the history of the legendary Grey Wardens.

The Grey Wardens are heroes across Thedas once again: the Archdemon has been defeated with relative ease and the scattered darkspawn are being driven back underground. The Blight is over. Or so it seems.

Valya, a young elven mage recently recruited into the Wardens, has been tasked with studying the historical record of previous Blights in order to gain insight into newly reported, and disturbing, darkspawn phenomena. Her research into the Fourth Blight leads her to an encoded reference scrawled in the margins of an ancient map, and to the hidden diary of Issenya, one of the last of the fabled griffon riders. As the dark secrets buried in Isseyna’s story unfold, Valya begins to question everything she thought she knew about the heroic Grey Wardens. . . .

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This novel tells the story about why the griffons disappeared from Thedas and it would definitely change your perspective on the Grey Wardens.. I always thought they were selfless heroes, but there’s always bad apples in any kind of faction. The novel kinda follows two stories, the story of Valya, who finds the diary owned by the main character in the second story, who goes by the name Isseya. It’s a rather tragic story because they do not treat the griffons well at all. Luckily it has a somewhat happy ending, so it was a good read for me at least. I don’t require all stories to have a happy ending, but when it is about innocent animals, it needs one.


Dragon Age: The Masked Empire by Patrick Weekes

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The Masked Empire (Dragon Age, #4)

Empress Celene of Orlais rose to the throne of the most powerful nation in Thedas through wisdom, wit, and ruthless manipulation. Now, the empire she has guided into an age of enlightenment is threatened from within by imminent war between the templars and the mages, even as rebellion stirs among the downtrodden elves To save Orlais, Celene must keep her hold on the throne by any means necessary.

Fighting with the legendary skill of the Orlesian Chevaliers , Grand Duke Gaspard has won countless battles for the empire and the empress But has he fought in vain? As the Circle fails and chaos looms, Gaspard begins to doubt that Celene’s diplomatic approach to the mage problem or the elven uprisings will keep the empire safe. Perhaps it is time for a new leader, one who lives by the tenets of the Chevalier’s Code, to make Orlais strong again.

Briala has been Celene’s handmaid since the two of them were children, subtly using her position to help improve the lives of elves across Orlais. She is Celene’s confidante, spymaster, and lover, but when politics force the empress to choose between the rights of Briala’s people and the Orlesian throne, Briala must in turn decide where her true loyalties lie.

Alliances are forged and promises broken as Celene and Gaspard battle for the throne of Orlais But in the end, the elves who hide in the forests or starve in the alienages may decide the fate of the masked empire.

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I would recommend to read this book before playing Dragon Age: Inquisition, as it helps you with understanding most of what is going on during the “Wicked eyes and wicked hearts” quest that takes place during one of Empress Celene’s great balls. The novel gives you an insight to Orlais’ politics and shows you just how terrible it could be to be an empress. We follow the story of Celene and her lover, the handmaiden Briala. Celene’s position is always being threatened by her distant cousin, the Grand Duke Gaspard who despises her female companion, and he despises her affinity towards the elves. It is a gruesome tale with a lot of death and deceit, but it is wonderfully written and it is one of my two favorites out of the dragon age novels.


 

American Gods by Neil Gaiman

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American Gods (American Gods, #1)

Days before his release from prison, Shadow’s wife, Laura, dies in a mysterious car crash. Numbly, he makes his way back home. On the plane, he encounters the enigmatic Mr Wednesday, who claims to be a refugee from a distant war, a former god and the king of America.

Together they embark on a profoundly strange journey across the heart of the USA, whilst all around them a storm of preternatural and epic proportions threatens to break.

Scary, gripping and deeply unsettling, American Gods takes a long, hard look into the soul of America. You’ll be surprised by what – and who – it finds there…

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I picked this up, read a bit over 100 pages and haven’t touched it again. The story is confusing me a lot, it feels so heavy to read and I don’t really know what is going on.. It’s also kinda gross, talking about someone dying with a dick in their mouth, then the main character kissing that corpse in a ‘dream’ after.. yuck. I might pick it back up some day but not right now. I’m sure it’s great though, everyone speaks so warmly of it, but they’re probably not as sensitive to certain topics as I am.

Have you read anything interesting this month?