Archives For Books

Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

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Wuthering Heights is a wild, passionate story of the intense and almost demonic love between Catherine Earnshaw and Heathcliff, a foundling adopted by Catherine’s father. After Mr Earnshaw’s death, Heathcliff is bullied and humiliated by Catherine’s brother Hindley and wrongly believing that his love for Catherine is not reciprocated, leaves Wuthering Heights, only to return years later as a wealthy and polished man. He proceeds to exact a terrible revenge for his former miseries. The action of the story is chaotic and unremittingly violent, but the accomplished handling of a complex structure, the evocative descriptions of the lonely moorland setting and the poetic grandeur of vision combine to make this unique novel a masterpiece of English literature.


 

When The Sleeper Wakes by HG Wells

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Graham, an 1890s radical pamphleteer who is eagerly awaiting the twentieth century and all the advances it will bring, is stricken with insomnia. Finally resorting to medication, he instantly falls into a deep sleep that lasts two hundred years. Upon waking in the twenty-second century to a strange and nightmarish place, he slowly discovers he is master of the world, revered by an adoring populace who consider him their leader. Terrified, he escapes from his chamber seeking solace—only to realize that not everyone adores him, some even wish to harm him.


 

The Messenger by Douglas Niles

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Exiled in disgrace to the harsh land called the Icereach, Kerrick, a Silvanesti elf, encounters a group of barbarian villagers that is making a determined stand against the encroachment of the remnants of a powerful ogre empire that is out to seize control of the frozen world.


 

The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore by W.B Yeats

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Best known for his poetry, William Butler Yeats (1865–1939) was also a dedicated exponent of Irish folklore. Yeats took a particular interest in the tales’ mythic and magical roots. The Celtic Twilight ventures into the eerie and puckish world of fairies, ghosts, and spirits. “This handful of dreams,” as the author referred to it, first appeared in 1893, and its title refers to the pre-dawn hours, when the Druids performed their rituals. It consists of stories recounted to the poet by his friends, neighbors, and acquaintances. Yeats’ faithful transcription of their narratives includes his own visionary experiences, appended to the storytellers’ words as a form of commentary.


 

The Body Snatcher by Robert Louis Stevenson

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A young man studying medicine in Edinburgh is asked by his professor to be responsible for receiving the cadavers to be dissected by the school’s students. Though he knows many are stolen from graves, he keeps his silence. Then one night he recognizes one of the cadavers as the victim of murder. Instead of turning in the culprit, he allows himself to be drawn deeper into the gruesome intrigue. But justice has the last laugh when the evidence of the man’s crimes – evidence he thought long since dissected and disposed of – mysteriously resurfaces to his everlasting horror.

 

What are you currently reading?

 

 

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Serial Reader

September 30, 2017 — 5 Comments

So recently I found this app on the google play store (not sponsored, I just really like it and want to share it with you). It’s called Serial Reader and it lets you “subscribe” to a lot of classic books, turning them into series. I’m pretty sure each “issue” you receive is a chapter from the book. You can pick what time you want it delivered at, I chose 9 am so I can spend my free time in the morning to read it before any activities I need to attend. With each issue you receive, it states how long it generally takes to read that particular part. You can also choose to “subscribe” to more serials, and you have a lot to choose from! You can search for something specific, browse a lot of different categories, or check out the top and trending lists.

 

The popular and trending lists change frequently based on what the readers choose to read, so you can check back now and then to find something new there if you don’t want to find something specific. Each series shows how many chapters, or issues it has, which gives you a general idea of how long you will spend on reading it. In general you receive one issue a day, but you can choose to read ahead too if you want.

 

The app also has a menu where you can choose to look at badges you earn by reading, you can highlight parts of the texts to save for later, you can create and add notes, add something to a ‘read later’ list and you can change your settings. The app also allows you to connect it to your Goodreads account. It will automatically sync what you’re reading and your progress. I really enjoy that option.

 

So that’s Serial Reader. It’s a rather simple but effective app and I enjoy it so much. It’s so neat to have portions of a book sent to you so that you can keep a habit of reading a little bit every day. It might not be for everyone, especially not if you prefer reading a lot in one sitting. Have you used this app before? Also, do you use Goodreads? Let’s become friends there, my account is here

What I read in September

September 27, 2017 — 13 Comments

A Warriors Journey by Paul Thompson and Tonya Cook.

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The first title in a new trilogy from Dragonlance author team Thompson and Cook. 
Writing team Thompson & Cook once again explore the history of the ancient Dragonlance world in “A Warrior’s Journey,” the first title in the new Ergoth trilogy. Considered the historical specialists of the Dragonlance world, the authors take the story to a colorful and violent era of its history that has not been previously chronicled in any novel. 
The mighty Ergothian empire is gripped by civil war. 
Centuries before the first Cataclysm sunders Ansalon, two imperial dynasties struggle for supremacy. Brutal warlords jockey for power, while corrupt wizards sell their skills to the highest bidder. Unnatural monsters prey on the unwary. 
Amid this chaos and upheaval, a brave young peasant shakes the towers of the mighty as his fate and the destiny of Krynn collide.

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This book follows the story of a farmer boy named Tol. He is just doing his duty when an injured man rides into the farm, he hides him and keeps him safe from some attackers, and suddenly Tol finds himself in a new city with a new title. The story is interesting enough, but Tol just achieves victory after victory and there isn’t really any thrill to it. It’s just him doing well and that’s pretty much it. It’s not the worst story I have read but it could do with more conflict, more sense of urgency during battle or during anything in general to keep the reader more engaged. This is the first book of a trilogy, but I don’t know if I would want to read the other two.


War for the oaks by Emma Bull

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War for the Oaks

Eddi McCandry has just left her boyfriend and their band when she finds herself running through the Minneapolis night, pursued by a sinister man and a huge, terrifying dog. The two creatures are one and the same: a phouka, a faerie being who has chosen Eddi to be a mortal pawn in the age-old war between the Seelie and Unseelie Courts. Eddi isn’t interested–but she doesn’t have a choice. Now she struggles to build a new life and new band when she might not even survive till the first rehearsal.

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This book was weird, really weird! It’s an old and not really modern book with outdated references and descriptions but it was entertaining. It is said to be the first proper urban fantasy book and that it is a true staple for anyone interested in the genre, but it all comes down to personal preference. It was a bit confusing to keep up with, Eddi was not the most likable character and I really wish there wasn’t as big of a focus on romance. The relationships that were formed didn’t really bring anything good to the story for me. I was more interested in the fae folk and everything that had to do with them and i feel like I was neglected that because of the space the romances needed. It kept me entertained for a while though so I had to give it a fairly good rating.


 

Dragon Age: Last Flight by Liane Merciel

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Last Flight (Dragon Age, #5)

Return to Thedas, the setting of BioWare’s award-winning Dragon Age dark fantasy rpg, and discover what dark, forgotten secrets lurk in the history of the legendary Grey Wardens.

The Grey Wardens are heroes across Thedas once again: the Archdemon has been defeated with relative ease and the scattered darkspawn are being driven back underground. The Blight is over. Or so it seems.

Valya, a young elven mage recently recruited into the Wardens, has been tasked with studying the historical record of previous Blights in order to gain insight into newly reported, and disturbing, darkspawn phenomena. Her research into the Fourth Blight leads her to an encoded reference scrawled in the margins of an ancient map, and to the hidden diary of Issenya, one of the last of the fabled griffon riders. As the dark secrets buried in Isseyna’s story unfold, Valya begins to question everything she thought she knew about the heroic Grey Wardens. . . .

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This novel tells the story about why the griffons disappeared from Thedas and it would definitely change your perspective on the Grey Wardens.. I always thought they were selfless heroes, but there’s always bad apples in any kind of faction. The novel kinda follows two stories, the story of Valya, who finds the diary owned by the main character in the second story, who goes by the name Isseya. It’s a rather tragic story because they do not treat the griffons well at all. Luckily it has a somewhat happy ending, so it was a good read for me at least. I don’t require all stories to have a happy ending, but when it is about innocent animals, it needs one.


Dragon Age: The Masked Empire by Patrick Weekes

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The Masked Empire (Dragon Age, #4)

Empress Celene of Orlais rose to the throne of the most powerful nation in Thedas through wisdom, wit, and ruthless manipulation. Now, the empire she has guided into an age of enlightenment is threatened from within by imminent war between the templars and the mages, even as rebellion stirs among the downtrodden elves To save Orlais, Celene must keep her hold on the throne by any means necessary.

Fighting with the legendary skill of the Orlesian Chevaliers , Grand Duke Gaspard has won countless battles for the empire and the empress But has he fought in vain? As the Circle fails and chaos looms, Gaspard begins to doubt that Celene’s diplomatic approach to the mage problem or the elven uprisings will keep the empire safe. Perhaps it is time for a new leader, one who lives by the tenets of the Chevalier’s Code, to make Orlais strong again.

Briala has been Celene’s handmaid since the two of them were children, subtly using her position to help improve the lives of elves across Orlais. She is Celene’s confidante, spymaster, and lover, but when politics force the empress to choose between the rights of Briala’s people and the Orlesian throne, Briala must in turn decide where her true loyalties lie.

Alliances are forged and promises broken as Celene and Gaspard battle for the throne of Orlais But in the end, the elves who hide in the forests or starve in the alienages may decide the fate of the masked empire.

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I would recommend to read this book before playing Dragon Age: Inquisition, as it helps you with understanding most of what is going on during the “Wicked eyes and wicked hearts” quest that takes place during one of Empress Celene’s great balls. The novel gives you an insight to Orlais’ politics and shows you just how terrible it could be to be an empress. We follow the story of Celene and her lover, the handmaiden Briala. Celene’s position is always being threatened by her distant cousin, the Grand Duke Gaspard who despises her female companion, and he despises her affinity towards the elves. It is a gruesome tale with a lot of death and deceit, but it is wonderfully written and it is one of my two favorites out of the dragon age novels.


 

American Gods by Neil Gaiman

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American Gods (American Gods, #1)

Days before his release from prison, Shadow’s wife, Laura, dies in a mysterious car crash. Numbly, he makes his way back home. On the plane, he encounters the enigmatic Mr Wednesday, who claims to be a refugee from a distant war, a former god and the king of America.

Together they embark on a profoundly strange journey across the heart of the USA, whilst all around them a storm of preternatural and epic proportions threatens to break.

Scary, gripping and deeply unsettling, American Gods takes a long, hard look into the soul of America. You’ll be surprised by what – and who – it finds there…

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I picked this up, read a bit over 100 pages and haven’t touched it again. The story is confusing me a lot, it feels so heavy to read and I don’t really know what is going on.. It’s also kinda gross, talking about someone dying with a dick in their mouth, then the main character kissing that corpse in a ‘dream’ after.. yuck. I might pick it back up some day but not right now. I’m sure it’s great though, everyone speaks so warmly of it, but they’re probably not as sensitive to certain topics as I am.

Have you read anything interesting this month?

What I read in August

August 23, 2017 — 17 Comments

Dragon Age: Asunder by David Gaider

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“A mystical killer stalks the halls of the White Spire, the heart of templar power in the mighty Orlesian Empire. To prove his innocence, Rhys reluctantly embarks on a journey into the western wastelands that will not only reveal much more than he bargained for but change the fate of his fellow mages forever.”

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Dragon Age: Asunder is a novel that kind of works as a prequel if you have played the video game Dragon Age: Inquisition. In this novel we follow the story of Rhys, and his friendship with the spirit Cole. You may know Cole from Inquisition as he aids you on your journey (if you allow him to stay with the inquisition of course), and here you get to know him more. I’m really glad that I read this because Cole has one of my favorite personalities. It may seem simple, but there is so much about him that is absolutely complicated.


 

Dragon Age: The Calling by David Gaider

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The Calling (Dragon Age, #2)

This is another thrilling prequel to “Dragon Age: Origins”, the hit role-playing video game from Bioware! King Maric has allowed the legendary Grey Wardens to return to Fereden. One of their own has aligned himself with their ancient enemy, the monstrous darkspawn. Maric agrees to lead the Grey Wardens, chasing after a deadly secret that threatens to destroy the Grey Wardens and the kingdom.

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As the description says, this is a prequel to Dragon Age: Origins. In the novel we get the backstory of the commander of the Grey in the game, Duncan. We also get to know more about King Maric and about how Alistair came to be. If you haven’t played the game, or isn’t interested in the lore behind it, then this will probably not be for you! Same with the book above this one on this list. I really liked it, it was nice to have some of the suspicions I had about the relations between characters confirmed.


 

Stars Above by Marissa Meyer

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Stars Above (The Lunar Chronicles, #4.5)

The universe of the Lunar Chronicles holds stories—and secrets—that are wondrous, vicious, and romantic. How did Cinder first arrive in New Beijing? How did the brooding soldier Wolf transform from young man to killer? When did Princess Winter and the palace guard Jacin realize their destinies?

With nine stories—five of which have never before been published—and an exclusive never-before-seen excerpt from Marissa Meyer’s upcoming novel, Heartless, about the Queen of Hearts from Alice in Wonderland, Stars Above is essential for fans of the bestselling and beloved Lunar Chronicles.


The Little Android: A retelling of Hans Christian Andersen’s “The Little Mermaid,” set in the world of The Lunar Chronicles.
Glitches: In this prequel to Cinder, we see the results of the plague play out, and the emotional toll it takes on Cinder. Something that may, or may not, be a glitch….
The Queen’s Army: In this prequel to Scarlet, we’re introduced to the army Queen Levana is building, and one soldier in particular who will do anything to keep from becoming the monster they want him to be.
Carswell’s Guide to Being Lucky: Thirteen-year-old Carswell Thorne has big plans involving a Rampion spaceship and a no-return trip out of Los Angeles.
The Keeper: A prequel to the Lunar Chronicles, showing a young Scarlet and how Princess Selene came into the care of Michelle Benoit.
After Sunshine Passes By: In this prequel to Cress, we see how a nine-year-old Cress ended up alone on a satellite, spying on Earth for Luna.
The Princess and the Guard: In this prequel to Winter, we see a game called The Princess
The Mechanic: In this prequel to Cinder, we see Kai and Cinder’s first meeting from Kai’s perspective.
Something Old, Something New: In this epilogue to Winter, friends gather for the wedding of the century…

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Stars Above is a collection of short stories about the characters in the book series “The lunar chronicles”. I read all four books in July, all thanks to Michala, and I talked about them in my previous “What I read..” post. I really enjoyed having some things cleared up, being able to get into the story again. I felt so empty when the series was over and this helped a little bit!


 

Hannibal by Mirko Jelusich

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Sadly, I couldn’t find a summary for this book online, nor does it have one on the back cover.. It is understandable though, for this one is from 1934. I found this among the pile of books my grandmother left behind and it seemed really interesting. I love historical novels so this was right up my alley. I couldn’t really figure out the book at first though, the Norwegian title for it translates to “The conqueror from Kartago”, while it’s true title is just “Hannibal”. Either way, in this novel we follow the war lord Hannibal through his mission to defeat and conquer Rome, hence the “Conqueror” title. It is written very well, and it leaves out any unnecessary details, just cutting together important snippets. If you’re into historical novels, and can get your hands on this, I would recommend giving it a read.


 

The Stars Compel by Michaela Roessner

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Tommaso Arista is the son of two of the most prestigious families of chefs to the household of Cosimo Ruggerio, noble astrologer to the Pope, and a powerful political figure in Florence and Rome. His mother is a Befanini — the hereditary cooks of the de’ Medici family, bound to the Dukes of Florence by centuries of both service and blood, family in all but the name.Catherine de’ Medici is the only legitimate heir to the de’ Medici fortune and titles. She is the Duchessina, but the title, and the incredible wealth, will go to the man who marries her. When her uncle and guardian, Pope Clement, recalls her to Rome to use her and her dowry as a precious pawn in his political maneuverings with the crowns of Europe, Catherine chooses Tommaso as her personal chef and head of her household — he will go with her to serve and protect her, and to be her friend in a dangerous place.

Catherine has plans for her future, plans that do not include being sold as part of the Pope’s treaty with France.

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This is a novel I originally started reading back in February, but I kept feeling like the language was too heavy for me and I stopped reading about half way through. Recently I felt like I should give it a try again and I got hooked. For some reason I find it so much easier to read now and I got to the end in no time. It’s kind of a historical novel, but at the same time it is very much fiction. I really enjoy it, it has great descriptions, just enough action to not make it boring and it features the descriptions of the most lovely food. It’s definitely making me want to look up recipes so I could try cooking them all on my own.

What have you read this month?

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Maybe..

Do I really think it’s a problem? No. Could I have acquired e-books to save space? Probably, but I much prefer to have a physical book in my hand. Gives me fewer headaches too. I’m not too keen on having a screen in front of me at all times. It used to be my favorite thing, now it is just a nuisance.

I used to collect games, collect magazines, but they never gave me that same sense of accomplishment as collecting books does. They didn’t smell as good either. I recently purchased a 20-fantasy-books-bundle thing and they all smell like incense because the storage facility they were in stored that too, and I love it. I don’t think I have ever owned a book that didn’t smell good. Does this talking about smelling books make me seem weird? If you enjoy smelling books too I’m sure you will understand me.

My collection mostly consist of fantasy books, some books based on video games, some books that have been made into movies, things like that. When I read, I really enjoy being able to escape into a world different from ours. I don’t necessarily want an altered reality, I just want something different, something that doesn’t feel like the world we know at all. I love learning about new worlds, new characters, new ways of living, magic, dragons, the lot. I also love post-apocalyptic stuff, for those who know me, they know that the Fallout game series is one of my favorites, and it is post-apocalyptic. It is a bit contradictory because it just shows a different version of what could be our future, but it still feels like a whole new world because, you know, do you think the world will be almost completely annihilated by atomic bombs by tomorrow? I sure hope not


 

This is just what I keep in my bedroom. I have a few more shelves full of books. If you notice any silver lines on them, it is books I have read, or re-read this year. 

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Some may think it’s a waste to spend so much money on books, but honestly, I buy almost everything on sale, or in bundles, I do everything I can to spend as little as possible. I really enjoy going to thrift stores to find cheap and old books too. I also have a few in my collection that were left behind by my grandmother who passed away in December. Some of the books are really old, the oldest from 1927, the second oldest from 1934. They still smell like her house and I enjoy just looking through them sometimes.

I don’t even really know why I wanted to write this post, I suppose I just wanted to talk about books for a while, about how happy they make me. My fondest memories of my childhood is from reading, staying up late with a small flashlight to read, hiding away from my parents. There was also a library on wheels, a bus that was modified with a lot of book shelves. It used to visit where I lived every other Wednesday, I was their most frequent visitor. Our library was never really open so this was pretty much my only way of borrowing books as a child. I’m so grateful for what they all did for me back then, and I’m so sad that it no longer exists. I guess I will just have to start driving to the next city over to borrow books, or just continue to purchase and hoard like I do now.

Do you have any fond memories of reading? Or do you hoard books like I do?

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