Krupenik – Recipe + Pictures

Lise —  August 14, 2017 — 29 Comments

“Light, nourishing and delicious – krupenik’s extraordinary combination of qualities is not a contradiction.”

Krupenik is a traditional Russian baked pudding made of common products found in many homes over the course of history, and its name derives from the word for grain, «крупа» (“krupa”).

I’ve tried quite a few pudding recipes over the year that claims to be somewhat healthy, I once made a semolina pudding but it called for almost a kilo (!) of sugar so I quickly decided against it. This one, however, only uses three tablespoons of it so I was much more willing to give it a try. Krupenik is described as a pudding perfect for those who are dieting, so I’m just going to believe that and eat it without feeling bad about it. This one can be served both as a dessert, and as the main meal for breakfast, and it doesn’t matter whether it’s hot or cold. I love eating mine hot with a bit of cinnamon on top.

Here’s what you need:

  • 250 grams of buckwheat. Rinsed well and roasted if you want it to be less “slimy” and more of a different texture.
  • 300 grams of farmers cheese. I’m lactose intolerant so I can’t have cheese, but I found a lactose free cream cheese I used as a replacement. It made the pudding more runny but it works if you’re in a pinch.
  • 2 eggs.
  • 100 grams of sour cream. Again, I found a lactose free alternative, I used the iMat Fraiche from Oatly.
  • 30 grams of butter. Milk free margarine for me.
  • 2 tablespoons of rusk flour. I just used crumbled up graham crackers.
  • 3 tablespoons of sugar. You honestly don’t need more than that, the cheese is what will give the pudding it’s flavor and it’s acidity.
  • Half a teaspoon of salt.

Here’s how to do it:

The first thing you gotta do is to fill a pot with a liter of water and then bring it to a boil. While that is happening you have to measure the 250 grams of buckwheat and make sure to rinse it thoroughly. It should say on the package that some people can be allergic to the color of the buckwheat that’s why it needs the rinse beforehand.

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Once the water is boiling, put the buckwheat in it and set a timer for 15 minutes. It should be more than enough to finish boiling it, and it will turn a little bit slimy once it’s finished. You won’t notice this texture after you bake the pudding.

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While the buckwheat is boiling, crack the two eggs into a bowl. Gently beat them to mix the yolk and the whites before adding in three tablespoons of sugar, whisking it all again to mix it properly.

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Add in the farmers cheese, cream cheese in my case. I had to use kitchen scales to measure up 300 grams, the boxes of cream cheese were 175 grams each, which was more than I needed.

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I would recommend using a hand mixer for mixing in the cheese, the mixture needs to be lump free and that is difficult to achieve with a regular whisk. A balloon whisk could maybe work but I don’t have that. Once everything is blended properly and the buckwheat has finished boiling, drain the water before adding it to the egg-sugar-cheese mixture. Stir it all together. With regular farmers cheese it wont be as liquid-y as mine is, the cream cheese doesn’t have much of a body to it.

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Line a small baking pan with rusk flour/graham cracker crumbs. You can basically use anything you want in this step to add some flavor to it, though dry, crumbly biscuits would work best. Adding salted biscuits could definitely work too to make the pudding less sweet, if that is what you prefer.

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Pour the mixture into the pan to cover the crumbs, make sure it is an even layer before covering the top with a thin layer of sour cream to add in more flavor. Put it in the oven and bake it in there at 190 degrees Celsius (about 374 F) for 40 minutes. I didn’t preheat my oven because it’s a hot air oven, and it doesn’t take long at all for it to reach 190 degrees Celsius.

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If you want the pudding to be a bit more baked, you can leave it in for an extra 10 ish minutes. Mine was in for five minutes longer than it should but it was still juicy and tasted just the way it should! I cut mine into squares, (well, it didn’t want to come out as squares but I tried!), and added some cinnamon on top. If you want, you can also add in raisins or berries or anything else to add sweetness or flavor!

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Krupenik

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Lise

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I'm a 26 year old girl. I love blogging about things like make up, skincare, books, video games, life, home decoration, gardening and whatnot. I love getting to know new people, let's start a conversation!

29 responses to Krupenik – Recipe + Pictures

  1. 

    Yummmmm – I love recipe posts!!!! I feel like we should collab on a food post – I get you to cook something British & you get me to cook something Norwegian Xxx

    Like

  2. 

    I’ve never heard of this before, I love baking and tying out new recipes and this looks like something I would enjoy! I’ve copied the recipe! Thanks for sharing x

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  3. 

    I never tried and heard of this. It is so great to get to know other cuisines and recipes. I hope you’ll do more posts like this in future. xx

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  4. 

    Iv never heard of this pudding, interesting. I dont eat dairy, but its got me thinking if I could make this as a healthy alternative for my family. I may even try it with dairy free alternatives, it could be a beautiful disaster lol

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  5. 

    This looks so yummy, always so interesting to see recipes from other cuisines. I do love a food post though 🤗

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  6. 

    Looks so yummy! I like that you have been trying out some Russian recipes lately!

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  7. 

    I hope to make this soon. I’ve got quite into baking recently and I want to try something new 😊

    Liked by 1 person

  8. 

    Oh my goodness this looks sooo good! Do you think it would change the recipe if I included something instead of cheese? I might try this but in a vegan version 😀

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    • 

      Hmm, the farmers/cream cheese is kinda used to bind it together, but I’m sure you could substitute it with something that has the same kind of viscosity! I know that there are a lot of soy based vegan cheeses out there at least 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  9. 

    I have never cooked anything with buckwheat! But if this is perfect for dieting and a pudding…..then I need to try it. I have such a craving for puddings and with a wedding to diet for, this could be my answer! Thanks for sharing 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  10. 

    Ive never heard of this but it looks lovely. I have a bit of a restricted pallete as i havent tried a lot of different cuisines so thanks for sharing!

    Like

  11. 

    This looks really interesting, haven’t heard of it before! x

    Like

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